1952 Ferrari 340 Mexico Berlinetta

1952 Ferrari 340 Mexico Berlinetta

Clearly, 1952 was going to be a factory fight to the finish, and Ferrari built four cars specifically for the Carrera Panamerican event. The factory Ferraris were named “Mexico” for the event. Designed by Giovanni Michelotti for Vignale, the 77.5-inch hood was one of the longest ever to grace a Ferrari, while the unique fenders extended beyond the oval grille in what is one of the most wildly attractive Vignale designs to date. Built as lightweight “340 America models,” with a small-diameter Tuboscossia chassis, the cars were powered by the Lampredi-designed, 4.1-liter V-12. With 280 horsepower on tap, the Mexicos were capable of 0-60 mph in six seconds and had a top speed of 174 mph – extraordinary performance both then and now.

As for this version shown? I took some liberties with the design given having ridden in a sister car when owned by Dean Batchelor when he worked for Bill Harrah in the large automobile museum in Sparks, Nevada. Dean wasn’t enthralled by the wire wheels as they were incapable of dealing with speed of this racer. Also it was very obvious upon sitting within the cockpit that there was minimal space — thus my pushing the A-pillar and windscreen further ahead to the doors edge. Other restyling efforts are constrainted to the trim, lettering, tailfin and rear arc of the tail itself.

This is another example of digital restyling and design by ModenaWest